How I Let My Students Use Tech In The Classroom

Once again, a curmudgeonly recommendation to remove “technology” (read: cell phones and laptops) from the classroom is making the rounds in higher education circles. And once again, we see people rightly criticizing “no technology” policies as ableist. Consider, for instance, this tweet below (which also includes a link to the current offending piece on banningContinue reading “How I Let My Students Use Tech In The Classroom”

When Classroom Management Failure Is An Understatement

I normally don’t talk about professional material on Mondays in this space, but, after last week, I think there’s something we need to talk about. Some of you may have seen Ball State University, where I teach, in the news lately. If you haven’t, here’s the story, go read it. I’ll wait. My understanding ofContinue reading “When Classroom Management Failure Is An Understatement”

I Asked My Students What Makes Good Writing. This Is What I Learned.

Yesterday, I opened class by asking my students what makes writing good. I’m not entirely surprised by the results that I got, but they are telling. I expected every section to mention description, but only three out of four did. The odd one out did mention world-building, though, so perhaps description is still represented. ButContinue reading “I Asked My Students What Makes Good Writing. This Is What I Learned.”

Things That Are Incompatible With Christianity

It’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in the U.S. That means we’ll hear all the usual “I Have A Dream” platitudes. In churches yesterday, hymns were sung along themes to honor the reverend doctor, such as traditional Aftican American spirituals. In the U.S., the word “Christian” is often conflated with conservative, Republican, etc. It’s aContinue reading “Things That Are Incompatible With Christianity”

Dr. Cox’s 3 Rules For Peer Criticism

Peer criticism is unquestionably important for learning, especially in writing. It’s also unquestionably tricky to implement effectively. To help out, in this post I offer three simple rules you can use to guide a peer criticism session. There is a lot against us in the traditional classroom when we try to implement peer criticism. ThereContinue reading “Dr. Cox’s 3 Rules For Peer Criticism”

How Cisgender People Benefit from Trans-Inclusivity

Many people in my closest social circle are on at least one of the LGBTQ+ spectrums of identity, and I’ve done my campus’s available Safe Zone training and proudly display my associated sticker on my door to welcome students, and generally my ally status is pretty secure and obvious. But despite all that, I myselfContinue reading “How Cisgender People Benefit from Trans-Inclusivity”

Teaching Against Deficiency

There’s been a lot of talk about “ungrading” and, of course, most of us are probably aware by now of the growing body of research that shows how standardized testing is not a useful measurement of student learning and may actually be doing harm to students. I don’t have anything really conclusive to say aboutContinue reading “Teaching Against Deficiency”

Ok, I Actually Liked Cats

Every time I visit my soon-to-be-in-laws, my movie knowledge increases immensely. They like movies and watch a lot of them. My soon-to-be-mother-in-law wanted to watch Cats. So did I. Her sons did not. We took the opportunity and dropped the menfolk off at another screen for another movie and settled in for some whimsy. AndContinue reading “Ok, I Actually Liked Cats”

New Semester’s Resolutions: Faster Feedback for Students (Spring 2020)

I don’t usually do New Year’s Resolutions (this year is a slight exception), but I do do New Semester’s Resolutions. I like the rhythm of fresh starts so regularly in academia . So let’s talk New Semester’s Resolutions this semester, Spring 2020. First, the philosophy of New Semester’s Resolutions: as teachers (and when we wereContinue reading “New Semester’s Resolutions: Faster Feedback for Students (Spring 2020)”

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started