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Imagine There’s No Grades

About a month ago, Asao Inoue visited my campus to talk about pedagogy and race; the room was packed, standing room only. Among his recommendations that day for addressing systemic racial injustice in education: Don’t grade. For most people who have been raised in most late 20th/early 21st century formal education systems, this seems impossible.Continue reading “Imagine There’s No Grades”

More About Plagiarism

Last week, I wrote about how the metaphors and imagery we use to impress the eeeeevils of plagiarism on our students results in scared, confused students. But that’s not the end of the story. Maybe our focus on plagiarism is the root problem because of its attendant focus on originality. What I mean is thatContinue reading “More About Plagiarism”

Stop Scaring Your Students About Plagiarism

It’s October, so it’s the season for spooooky things. So, let’s talk about plagiarism! No, but, really, stop scaring your students about plagiarism. Seriously. Stop. They’re terrified. They’re paralyzed with fear at the horrible p-word. STOP IT. “But,” I hear you say, “students need to know that plagiarism is bad! They need to know thatContinue reading “Stop Scaring Your Students About Plagiarism”

Fanfiction is Research

You heard me right. Not fanfiction and research. Not fanfiction requires research. Not even fanfiction should be researched. All of those are true statements. But today I want to do a quick argument: fanfiction is research. I want to clarify something: I’m pro-fanfiction but I don’t really write fanfiction. This is not because I thinkContinue reading “Fanfiction is Research”

Writing Rules and Genre

This semester I’m having my students write in a number of genres. That’s not a bad thing (actual results may vary…). But, as happens every semester, we’re struggling. We’re struggling because my class isn’t my students’ first exposure to writing (my students are adults–they’ve actually been writing for a LONG time, whether they realize itContinue reading “Writing Rules and Genre”

The Walled Garden

One day in graduate school, I told to my thesis adviser (and later dissertation adviser) that I felt like I was being kept in a walled garden in the English department. English as a discipline had appealed to me initially because it’s so diverse in their topics and methods of study. Here, I could borrowContinue reading “The Walled Garden”